When Flowers and Candles Protect Citizens From the Mean Guys

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If you are feeling down thinking about the Paris attacks, here is a video that will lift your spirits up. The heartfelt video showcases a conversation between a French father and son who put things into perspective for many. The video shows an interview by French media (Le Petit Journal sur Canal+) at the scene of the Bataclan attacks. During the interview a young scared boy is asked if he understands the gravity of situation. The toddler immediately replies saying that bad people are doing very mean things here. The worried boy is shaken enough to assume that now his family will have to leave the country. When the father assures that they will not abandon their country out of fear, the child tries his best to reason with his dad reminding him about mean guys who are still out there.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jb_5QlLQQH8

Stating that there are bad guys everywhere, the father urges his son to look at the goodness that is still left with the citizens – flowers (which might stand for empathy, care, love) and candles (hopes, prayers, resilience) in a beautiful response. Instantly the child’s expressions change and he feels a lot safer in midst of this unfortunate chaos.

Speaking to the journalist on Saturday, the boy’s father said that he ‘really wanted to be there’ because his family, who are also from an immigrant background, ‘were very touched by what happened’. 

He said he wanted to teach his son to be ‘proud of the country’ they live in, and the values it represents, and that he wanted to take him to the memorial to ‘explain to him what’s going on’. 

One might notice that instead of pointing fingers at religions or scriptures, the father son duo condemn bad men and their mean actions. The reasoning behind not running away and standing tall is not as simplistic as baby talk here. It is something that we all can reflect and believe. Bad guys are everywhere and so are love and prayers. There is no running or hiding, but standing tall with heads high in times of despair.

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